Accreditation Instruments

NUMERICAL EVALUATION DESCRIPTION

5    –   Excellent: provision is very extensive and functioning excellently
4    –   Very Good: provision is moderately extensive and functioning very well
3    –   Good: provision is adequate and functioning well
2    –   Fair: provision is limited but functioning well
1    –   Poor: provision is very limited and functioning poorly
0    –   Missing: provision is missing but necessary
NA –   Not Applicable: provision does not apply

N.1. ADMISSION STANDARDS

N.1.1. The entrance requirements are above those set by the Association for the programme.

1. The institution has its admission and retention policies.
2. The entrance requirements of the institution exceed those set by the Association for the program.
3. The admission and retention policies are published in the official document available to any interested party.

N.1.2. The school is careful in screening applicants before admission.

1. The school has a set of criteria in screening student-applicants.
2. The set of criteria in screening student-applicants conforms with the program/degree he/she is applying for.
3. The screening of student applicants is done by qualified persons.

N.1.3. The school is free to select or reject students.

1. The school has its Admission and Retention Committee given the freedom to accept or not the student-applicants.
2. The school conducts an orientation on the admission and retention requirements.
3. The Admission and Retention Committee members are aware of their functions and familiar with the admission and retention requirements of the seminary.

N.2. FACULTY

N.2.1 The school has met the required number of full time teaching faculty members with academic qualifications adequate for the programme

1. The school has an adequate number of full-time faculty members for the programme being offered.
2. The academic qualifications of full-time faculty meet the standards set by the Association.
3. The school has policies and procedures on recruitment and appointment of qualified faculty applicants.

N.2.2. The full-time faculty is sufficient in number for students enrolled.

1. The number of full-time faculty is sufficient for the number of students enrolled in the program.
2. The full-time faculty members are aware of the institution’s policy on regular, tutorial, and independent studies.
3. The school has a policy in determining the teaching assignments of faculty.

N.2.3. The student /faculty ratio does not exceed the educational standard (20:1).

1. The student and faculty ratio does not exceed the standard set by the Association.
2. The school adopts flexibility in cases where faculty-student ratio exceeds the standard set by the association.
3. There is a policy on faculty-student ratio exceeding the standard set by the Association.

N.2.4. The school has an adequate faculty development policy.

1. The school has a Faculty Development Program.
2. The school has sufficient budget allocation for the Faculty Development Program.
3. The school has provisions for the professional growth and development of faculty like seminars, conferences, etc.

N.2.5. The faculty members represent various disciplines.

1. The faculty members teach in their major fields/areas of specialization.
2. Various areas are taught by qualified faculty members.
3. When necessary, faculty members with more than one area of specialization can handle classes related to other fields.

N.2.6. Faculty members are well-informed of their essential tasks.

1. Faculty members are given other committee works and extra-curricular activities without compromising their essential tasks as teachers.
2. Extra class responsibilities are distributed evenly among the faculty members.
3. Teaching performance is considered in assigning teaching load.

N.2.7. The ratio of full-time national faculty to full-time foreign faculty is less than 2:1.

1. There is an acceptable ratio of full-time national faculty to foreign faculty members.
2. There is a strong evidence of good human relations among national and foreign faculty.
3. There is no bias in giving of teaching assignments among national and foreign faculty.

N.2.8. The school has sufficient provision for faculty scholarly research and writing.

1. The school allocates funds and allows time for research and writing.
2. The faculty members have research and writings published in refereed national and international journals.
3. Research and writings of faculty are related to and utilized in their field of specialization.

N.2.9. The school provides a conscious faculty development plan for women.

1. The strategic plan of the school has provisions for women faculty members.
2. The school ensures gender balance in faculty composition.
3. The development/strategic plan is gender fair.

N.3. CURRICULUM AND FIELD EDUCATION

N.3.1. The curriculum does not have too many courses that are set outside a specific framework or thrust.

1. The sequence of general education and major fields/areas of specialization is logical.
2. Pre-requisites are strictly complied, both for general education and professional subjects.
3. The curriculum is periodically reviewed and updated to conform to latest framework and thrusts.

N.3.2. The relation between class hours and the time provided for independent study is proportionate.

1. The school adopts a policy that addresses the relation between class hours and time for independent studies.
2. Independent studies are closely monitored to serve the students better.
3. Class hours and schedule for independent studies are documented.

N.3.3. The curriculum relates sufficiently to the contemporary situation of the church and society.

1. The program of studies/curriculum is relevant to the needs of the church and society that the school serves.
2. The curriculum provides opportunities for church/social/community involvement.
3. There is a provision for community feedback to enrich the curriculum.

N.3.4. The curriculum is strong in gender issues and women’s concerns.

1. Historical and philosophical foundations are included in courses on gender and women.
2. Theological and biblical scholarships on gender and women’s issues are updated regularly.
3. The curriculum explicitly promotes gender justice in all areas of discipline.

N.3.5. The curriculum is strong in issues and concerns regarding persons with special needs (differently-abled, homosexual, HIV/AIDS, etc.).

1. Biblical, historical, and theological foundations are included in courses related to persons with special needs.
2. The curriculum helps students, faculty, and other stakeholders understand the psychological, social, economic, and emotional struggles and concerns of persons with special needs.
3. The curriculum is designedto provide students with opportunities to minister to people with special needs.

N.3.6. The curriculum is strong in the areas of the history, culture and religions of the nation and of the region.

1. Courses on the history, culture and religions of the nation and of the region are offered.
2. The courses on history, culture, and religions of the nation are presented fairly.
3. The curriculum promotes openness, respect, and appreciation for the history, culture, and religions of the nation and the region.

N.3.7. Academic and practical disciplines encourage contextualization in theological reflection and action.

1. The curriculum encourages contextualization in theological reflection and action based on ATESEA’s Guidelines for Doing Theologies in Asia.
2. Academic and practical disciplines are grounded in sound theology and consistent with the Christian faith and values.
3. Academic and practical disciplines compliment each other.

N.3.8. The planning and/or supervision of field education is adequate.

1. The field education internship is supervised by a qualified faculty.
2. The school has an adequate planning and/or supervision of field education internship.
3. Field supervisors provide adequate mentoring and supervision of the students.

N.3.9. The curriculum equips students to become enablers of the Christian community.

1. The curriculum teaches students to recognize the gifts of people to carry out their diverse ministries.
2. The academic and practical disciplines prepare students to minister in various settings.
3. The curriculum inculcates commitment and passion for long-term ministry.

N.3.10 The school provides opportunities for enhancing effective and innovative teaching skills.

1. The school makes deliberate efforts to improve creative methods of teaching.
2. The school provides modern tools/media and other instructional materials for teachers.
3. The school uses appropriate assessment tools in evaluating the effectiveness of teaching.

N. 3.11. Sufficient emphasis is placed on the academic language as a tool for study.

1. The school provides classes to improve the students’ academic proficiency.
2. The school has programs to assist students with deficiencies in academic language, reading, and comprehension.
3. The program of study is readily available.

N. 3.12. The school conducts a regular student learning assessment.

1. The school provides learning goals for each of the courses of the degree programs.
2. The learning goals reflect the vision, mission and goals of the school.
3. The school uses an instrument in evaluating the relevance of the degree programs to student learning outcomes, percentage of graduates and their placements

N.4 LIBRARY

N.4.1 The library meets the required number of titles for the program levels

A. Bachelor’s Level:      6,000 appropriate titles
B. Graduate Studies:     10,000-15,000 appropriate titles
C. Postgraduate Studies:  30,000 appropriate titles

N.4.2. The quality of books and other learning resources is adequate.

1. The quality of the library collection is adequate for the various programs offered.
2. Books and other resource materials are updated constantly.
3. The library collection includes sufficient titles for the different disciplines of study and are accessible to users..

N.4.3. There are sufficient books and resource materials in the national language.

1. There are adequate provisions for books and other materials in the national language.
2. Books and other resources in the national language are readily accessible to the users.
3. Books and other resources in the national language are evaluated regularly to ensure availability of current edition.

N.4.4. There are sufficient books and other learning resource materials on gender concerns and issues.

1. The institution provides sufficient books and other learning materials on gender concerns and issues.
2. The institution maintains an appropriate quality of books and other learning materials on gender concerns and issues.
3. Books and other learning materials on gender concerns and issues are evaluated and updated regularly to ensure availability of current edition.

N.4.5. There are sufficient books and other learning materials on issues and concerns regarding persons with special needs (differently–  abled, homosexual, HIV/AIDS, etc.).

1. The institution provides sufficient books and other learning resources on issues and concerns regarding persons with special needs.
2. The school maintains an appropriate quality of books and other resources on persons with special needs.
3. Books and other resources on issues and concerns regarding persons with special needs are evaluated and updated regularly to ensure availability of current edition.

N.4.6. There is an adequate selection of titles in certain fields.

1. The school has written policies on the selection and acquisition of titles to have an adequate and balanced library collection.
2. The library implements policies on selection and acquisition of titles.
3. There is an evidence on implementation of the above policies.

N.4.7. The selection of periodicals is adequate.

1. Periodicals cover a variety of subjects.
2. The periodicals are relevant to the interests and needs of users.
3. The library maintains an up-to-date subscription of periodicals.

N.4.8. The circulation of books and other resource materials is efficient.

1. The library has a system of monitoring the circulation of books and other materials.
2. Circulation of books and other resources is checked and evaluated to ensure effective use.
3. The library adopts equitable lending policies and procedures to improve its services.

N.4.9. The library cataloguing systems are adequate.

1. The cataloguing systems adopted by the institution are well-organized according to  library standards.
2. An accepted system of cataloguing and classification of books is maintained properly by keeping its entries up to date.
3. Constant checking of catalog records is maintained to ensure the correctness of information retrieved by library users.

N.4.10. The library budget is adequate for necessary acquisitions. When the library has met only the accreditation minimum, 5% of the budget is expected. Where the minimum library acquisition is tripled and beyond, then 3%.

1. There are adequate funds for the acquisition of library resources (at least 5% of the institution’s budget).
2. There is provision in the budget for the operation and maintenance of library facilities.
3. There is provision in the budget for the acquisition and upgrading of library equipment (computers, audio-visual/modern).

N.4.11. The librarian(s) is (are) professionally trained.

1. There are qualified and licensed full-time librarians.
2. The librarian(s) has (have) academic status and actively involved in curricular, instructional and institutional planning.
3. There are provisions for seminars and trainings for librarians for their continuing professional development.

N.4.12. The library space is sufficient for the student population.

1. There are adequate reading/research space and seats provided.
2. The space in the library is large enough to provide a conducive atmosphere for study and research.
3. There is provision for students working on their theses and dissertations.

N.4.13. The library administration is efficient in the following aspects.

1. The library organizational set-up is clear.
2. A manual for library policies, rules and regulations, and procedures is available.
3. The librarian informs the faculty and students of newly acquired materials that are ready for use.

N.5. COMMUNITY LIFE AND SPIRITUAL FORMATION

N.5.1. The emphasis on nurture, spiritual discipline and worship is adequate. The school seeks to foster a renewing spiritual formation which is effectively integrated with academic study for Christian life, growth and action.

1. There are evidences that nurture, spiritual discipline, and worship are observed.
2. There is an evidence that spiritual formation is integrated in the academic studies.
3. The school consistently and thoughtfully monitors the spiritual development of the students.

N.5.2. Relationships and community life are strong in the following areas:

A. Faculty-administration

1. The administration provides a clear job description, information on rights, performance evaluation, career paths and development to the faculty.
2. The administration implements faculty rights and other conditions for employment consistently and appropriately.
3. There is an evidence of an open communication between the administration and the faculty.

B. Faculty-faculty

1. Fellowship, sports, and other social functions are encouraged to promote cooperation and mutual understanding among faculty members.
2. Teamwork and team building are evident in accomplishing common goals in teaching and other related activities.
3. Cultural diversities are respected.

C. Faculty-students

1. Teachers are available for counseling and other personal conferences with  students.
2. Teachers provide the students orientation on academic expectations, requirements and other support services.
3. There is academic freedom in the classroom.

D. Students-students

1. Students exercise their leadership potentials and creativity in implementing their approved programs, both within and outside the campus, including healthy competitions in sports, academic, cultural, and other activities.
2. Students support each other with regards to their individual problems and needs.
3. Students are able to resolve conflicts among themselves in a healthy and peaceful manner.

N.5.3. Student participation in education policy-making and planning is strong.

1. There is an existing student organization representing the students in many aspects of community life in the campus.
2. The student body serves as a channel to give inputs and feedbacks to the administration and governing board for better formulation of educational policies.
3. Students are consulted in planning activities for their own welfare.

N.6. ON GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT

N.6.1. The Board of Trustees/Governors has a clear understanding of its task and is efficient in discharging its responsibilities.

1. The members of the Board of Trustees/Governors understand the structure and their scope of authority and their legal responsibilities.
2. The board members are able to articulate their understanding of their role as policy makers and delegation of powers in implementing policies.
3. The Board of Trustees/Governors ensures that the school’s vision and mission are met.

N.6.2. The composition of the Board of Trustees/Governors has a reasonable representation of lay people, women, alumni and other sectors of the community.

1. The Board seeks to balance the diversity of ethnicity, gender, profession and representation of the community.
2. The school’s Constitution and By-laws provide for a representation of laypersons, women, alumni, and other sectors of the community.
3. There is a committee or body that ensures reasonable representation of the above-mentioned groups.

N.6.3. The appointing bodies are responsible for selecting their representatives to the Board of Trustees/Governors.

1. An evidence exists that there is a conscious awareness of equal and fair evaluation of the qualifications and composition of their representatives to the Board of Trustees/ Governors.
2. The appointing bodies have guidelines in the process of selecting their representatives to the Board of Trustees/Governors.
3. The criteria for selecting representatives to the Board of Trustees/Governors are published.

N.6.4. The Faculty possesses effective control over admission, the curriculum and other aspects of the academic life of the school, including field education.

1. The Faculty is involved in the institutional planning, monitoring and evaluation of the curriculum and other programs to achieve the vision, mission, and goals of the institution.
2. The Faculty ensures the implementation of policies in selecting student applicants and in encouraging diversity of the student body in the areas of denomination, gender, region, ethnicity, and the like.
3. The Faculty designs and evaluates the curriculum regularly, including field education,  in light of the goals of each program.

N.6.5. The management structure of this school is adequate to carry out its programs.

1. There is a clear organizational chart that shows the school’s management structure.
2. There is evidence that the administrators, faculty, and students understand the structure and scope of the school’s management structure.
3. The management structure of the school has established a system that supports the implementation of the programs.

N.6.6. The school has a systematic way of promoting and remunerating the faculty and staff.

1. The school ensures the quality of life for the faculty and staff as shown in its policies on personnel development.
2. The faculty and staff remuneration is comparable with that of other reputable schools. 3. The school has clear guidelines on the promotion of its faculty and staff.

N.6.7. The school is punctual in submitting reports.

The Institutional Self-Study Reports were submitted on time.

N.7. FINANCES

N.7.1. The school depends primarily on local financial support.

1. The institution is funded by local sources above 50% of its financial requirements.
2. The school has established procedures to maintain self-sufficiency.

N.7.2. The school has made significant progress in reducing foreign financial support (has generated more than 5% local support for the last 3 years).

1. The school exists to reduce the program’s dependency on foreign income sources.
2. The school has reduced dependency on foreign support by at least 40%.

N.7.3. Faculty and Staff salaries meet the prevailing standards in comparable/similar academic communities or churches within the region/locality.

1. Salaries for full-time and part-time faculty of the institution are in accordance with the prevailing standards implemented by law.
2. Faculty and staff salaries follow the salary standard comparable/similar to academic community or church within the region/locality.

N.7.4. Faculty and staff terms of service are efficient in the following aspects:

7.4.1 Fringe benefits such as sabbatical, health insurance, retirement, maternity/paternity leave, academic scholarships, vacation/sick leave.

a. The school provides the above fringe to its fulltime faculty and staff.

7.4.2 Ranking and promotion

a. The school provides a scheme for ranking and promotion of employees.

7.4.3 Security of Tenure

a. The school implements and periodically reviews its guidelines for security of tenure of its employees

N.7.5. The financial management is sufficient in the following aspects:

7.5.1. There are audited financial statements

a. The school maintains its audited financial statements
b. The school maintains an accounting and auditing system to ensure accountability of school funds.

7.5.2. There is a designated staff to manage the finances.

a. The school has a finance officer designated to manage and assess the finances of the institution.
b. The school has an accountant to audit and examine the financial status of the institution.

N.7.6. The school provides adequate funding for faculty, staff and student recruitment programs.

1. The school provides adequate funds for faculty, staff and student recruitment programs.
2. The school has a systematic plan for its recruitment activities.

N.7.7. The budget is adequate and realistic in the following aspects:

1. The school has clear sources of revenues.
2. The operational expenses are met adequately.

N.8. RELATIONSHIP WITH OTHER SCHOOLS, THE CHURCH, AND THE COMMUNITY

N.8.1. The school fosters creative relationships with other theological institutions.

1. Linkages/consortia through MOA (Memorandum of Agreement)/MOU (Memorandum of Understanding) are forged to show the relationship with other theological schools.
2. The school participates in inter-seminary/school programs.
3. The school’s resources and services are accessible to other theological institutions.

N.8.2. The school has a creative relationship with the church in the following aspects:

1. Linkages with the church are established clearly.
2. The school is involved in church-related programs.
3. The school’s resources and services are accessible to the churches it serves.

N.8.3. The school fosters a creative relationship with the University or other departments in the University system.

1. All departments in the school are interdependent of each other in supporting development programs/projects of the insitution.
2. The school conducts a regular evaluation of activities with other departments.
3. Recommendations to improve cooperative relationships with other departments are implemented.

N.8.4. The school fosters a meaningful relationship with the community in the following aspects:

1. The school has established linkages with the community through Memorandum of Understanding or Memorandum of Agreement.
2. The school is involved in community related programs.
3. The school’s resources and services are accessible to the community it serves.

N.8.5. The school promotes cooperative efforts with other churches.

1. The school offers its services to churches outside its own denomination.
2. The school admits students from other denominations.
3. The school holds activities and programs in cooperation with other churches.

N.8.6. The school exercises institutional freedom to determine its programs and projects.

1. The school maintains autonomy in determining its programs, projects and activities within the bounds of legal or political, spiritual and cultural parameters.
2. The school encourages dialogues with its stakeholders to discuss common issues and concerns.
3. Stakeholders support the school programs and projects.

N.9. BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENT

N.9.1 There is an office that takes charge of the physical plant.

1. There is a director/head of the physical plant.
2. Procurement of supplies and equipment is documented adequately.
3. A plan for the expansion of the physical plant is available.

N.9.2. The physical plant is used efficiently.

1. The buildings and rooms are accessible and efficient in relation to their location and function.
2. Traffic flow inside the school campus is smooth.
3. Maximum use of facilities and cost saving measures are implemented.

N.9.3. The buildings and grounds of the school are maintained properly.

1. The school has proper janitorial and maintenance system.
2. Pest control, potability test for drinking water, and calibration of equipment are conducted periodically.
3. Plans for the maintenance and expansion of the physical plant are available and implemented.

N.9.4. The school takes efficient steps in securing the safety of its plant and facilities.

1. Signages for entrance, exits, fire escapes, and the like are in place.
2. Buildings have provisions for the use of persons with disabilities.
3. Building facilities are made of strong materials which can stand against typhoon, earthquake, and fire.

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